Know Your Rights To Sunlight

Solar power in California is booming.  Homeowners, businesses,
utilities, farmers, environmental activists, and others look to the
renewable energy of the sun as a clean and abundant answer to the
State's energy demands.  But few know of the unique and powerful
laws which regulate access to sunlight --
solar rights -- and the
ways these laws will shape California's future.

This website is devoted to exploring developments in the area of
Solar Rights, in general, and the legal facets of California's Solar
Rights laws, in particular.
solar-rights.com is brought to you by the law firm of
Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin, whose attorneys are
dedicated to advancing California's sustainable future
through sound legal advice and zealous advocacy.
SOLAR RIGHTS IN THE NEWS
A daily compilation of news, articles, and developments in the field of solar rights.
What is the Solar Rights Act?

The California Solar Rights Act was
adopted in the 1970's when solar power
development was in its infancy and
homeowners were generally
wary of
neighbors installing large, unattractive
solar equipment on their homes.  While it
is unlikely that its future consequences
were anticipated then, the Solar Rights
Act has developed into the primary legal
tool by which property owners gain
protections over the installation of solar
power systems on their homes and
businesses.

Read the comprehensive legal analysis
of California's Solar Rights Act and Solar
Shade Control Act by
clicking here

The statutes comprising California's
Solar Rights Act can be accessed by
clicking here.

Solar Electric Permit Fees in Southern
California
.  Read the report published by
the Sierra Club by
clicking here.
All rights reserved.
Northern California:  707.542.4833
Southern California:  562.699.5500
info@agclawfirm.com
January 9, 2012

RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECTS GO UNUSED (From the Los Angeles Times, written
by Julie Cart
)

Millions of dollars in renewable energy projects intended to provide power to facilities in
California's national parks and forests are sitting idle because of a years-long squabble
with Southern California Edison.  A new $800,000 solar project at Death Valley National
Park, photovoltaic panels at the state-of-the art visitors center at Santa Monica Mountains
National Recreation Area and a solar power system at the U.S. Forest Service's new
facility at Mono Lake are among dozens of taxpayer-funded projects in Southern
California on hold as the federal agencies try to hash out an agreement with SCE to tie
the projects to the state's electrical grid.  [
Full article]

September 6, 2011

SOLAR COMPANY RECEIVING FEDERAL LOANS FOLDS (From the Wall Street Journal)

A California solar-panel manufacturer once touted by President Barack Obama as a
beneficiary of his administration's economic policies — as well as a half-billion-dollar
federal loan — is laying off 1,100 workers and filing for bankruptcy. [
Full article]

August 24, 2011

ROHNERT PARK SOLAR PROJECT A PILOT FOR PUBLIC-PRIVATE FINANCING (From
North Bay Business Journal, written by Jeff Quackenbush
)

A planned project to double the size of the 1 megawatt solar array atop the expansive
rooftops of the Sonoma Mountain Village development in Rohnert Park this fall could also
greatly expand the use of property-assessed clean energy (PACE) financing for energy-
efficiency and renewable energy projects nationwide by allowing cash-strapped local
governments to tap hundreds of millions of dollars of private money to fund the work.  [
Full
article]

June 21, 2011

FEES IMPOSED BY LOCAL CALIFORNIA GOVERNMENT ENTITIES FOR SOLAR
INSTALLATION VARY DRAMATICALLY (
Report completed by the Sierra Club)

The Sierra Club (Angeles and Loma Prieta Chapters) are following up on a campaign to
encourage municipalities in Los Angeles County to support the installation of residential
and commercial roof-top solar power systems by lowering permit fees.  Back in June
2009, the Sierra Club, Angeles Chapter formally asked L. A. County municipalities with
unreasonably high residential solar permit fees to consider lowering them to cost-
recovery levels.  Between 2009 and 2011, some significant changes in solar permit fees
have occurred: 38 cities have lowered them (but 14 have raised fees) for residential PV
systems. During the period of the latest study, between January 2011 and June 2011,
fifteen cities have significantly  lowered their commercial solar permit fees while two
others have raised them.  (Note that “significant” is defined as fee changes greater than
$100.)  [
Full article]

April 19, 2011

RIVERSIDE SOLAR PROJECT GETS FEDERAL SUPPORT (From Los Angeles Times,
written by Tiffany Hsu
)

Yet another California renewable energy project will get financial support from the federal
government, Energy Secretary Steven Chu and Gov. Jerry Brown said Monday.
The first two parts of the Blythe Solar Power Project in Riverside County were awarded a
conditional commitment for a $2.1-billion loan guarantee from the Department of Energy
-– the controversial program’s largest offering to a solar project.  [
Full article]

January 28, 1011

STUDENTS PROTEST INSTALLATION OF SOLAR PANELS IN FRONT OF HISTORIC
SCHOOL (
From Orange County Register, written by Jaimee Lynn Fletcher)

Discrimination attorney Gloria Allred says she'll be in Huntington Beach Thursday
afternoon to support the students protesting the installation of two solar panels in front of
the historic Dwyer Middle School.
"The police chief of Huntington Beach has met with the children and many feel that the
police have threatened the students with arrest if they hold the protest as planned," Allred
said in a news release.  [
Full article]

November 22, 2010

USE OF SOLAR POWER GROWS IN PASADENA (From Pasadena Star News, written by
Brenda Gazzar
)

For Joe Wang, choosing an option to install solar panels to help power his newly built
home next to Pasadena High School just made sense.
"One, (it's) to lower our electrical bills and two, because it's the right thing to do for the
environment," said Wang, 40, who moved into his home earlier this month at the
Rosecrest Lane community in the Victory Park area of Northeast Pasadena.
Wang and his wife Emily are among an increasing number of local residents and
businesses taking advantage of Pasadena Water and Power's solar initiative, which aims
to help its customers install panels that can generate 14 megawatts of solar power by
2017 in line with state guidelines. [
Full article]

October 28, 2010

CALTECH UNVEILS NEW SOLAR PROJECT (From Pasadena Star News, written by
Beige Luciano-Adams
)

Caltech officials Wednesday unveiled a new 1.1-megawatt solar energy system that will
help the campus meet its goal of reaching 1.3 megawatts by 2010 - and stay ahead of the
curve in renewable energy.
"This is the last installment of solar to reach our goal - and hopefully we'll keep going,"
said John Onderdonk, manager of Caltech's new sustainability programs division.
The solar program is a key - and highly visible - part of the school's recently sparked
green initiative. [
Full article]

October 21, 2010

SOLAR PLANT UNDER CONSTRUCTION ON CITY LAND (From Cooler Planet, written by
Nate Lew
)

City-owned land in Central California soon will see a privately-owned solar plant that is
expected to be in operation by the end of the year.
Construction has begun on land west of the Porterville airport to install more than 29,000
solar panels that will supply about 4,300 homes with energy. The plant is expected to be
one of California's largest privately-owned solar plants and the panels will be installed
directly on the ground.
"We're going to put electricity directly into the neighborhood circuits and thus avoiding the
need to build a transmission line to remote areas," according to plant owner Southern
California Edison. [
Full article]

CHEVRON AND SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SCHOOL DISTRICT JOIN IN SOLAR EFFORT
(
From Cooler Planet, written by Nate Lew)

The Huntington Beach City School District and Chevron Energy are merging efforts to
construct a 618 kilowatt solar system expected to power 30 percent of the southern
California school district.
On Wednesday, the school district broke ground for the project that will see photovoltaic
solar panels installed on three elementary and two middle schools, according to the
school district. Construction will begin in November and continue through December.
"We're really excited," said Jon Archibald, school district spokesman. "It should take about
six weeks to do the work. And then hopefully the sun will shine." [
Full article]

October 20, 2010

SOLAR PROJECT ON WESTERN LAND APPROVED BY US GOVERNMENT (From the
Washington Post, Associated Press
)

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar has approved a big solar energy plant in the Mojave
Desert, making it the fifth such project on western U.S. public lands to win federal
authorization.
Salazar's approval Wednesday authorizes the Bureau of Land Management to offer
Tessera Solar use of more than 4,600 acres for 30 years to build the Calico Solar Project.
[
Full article]

April 12, 2010

CALIFORNIA CITIES LEAD THE WAY IN BECOMING CARBON NEUTRAL  (From guardian.
co.uk
)

State governments are beginning to set the stage for widespread climate action with
emissions laws, energy efficiency rules and renewable energy standards, but the hands-
on work of actually achieving carbon-neutral status is happening in cities.
Let's look at California as an example. The state is leading the nation down the green
path overall, adopting statewide policies that encourage residents to reduce their carbon
footprints and change their wasteful ways.
It is implementing the first-ever law that uses regulatory and market mechanisms to
reduce green house gas (GHG) emissions. AB 32, or the California Global Warming
Solutions Act of 2006, is expected to reduce carbon emissions to 1990 levels by 2020 and
80% by 2050. But that's only the start. [
Full article]

April 6, 2010

LADWP NEEDS MORE EFFECTIVE FEED-IN TARIFF PROGRAM (From Curbed LA,
written by Adrian Glick Kudler
)

Part of Mayor Villaraigosa's solar program released last year includes what's called a
feed-in tariff program, to be administered by the Department of Water and Power. A FiT
requires utilities to buy solar power generated by residents, businesses, and public
organizations. The system has worked in Sacramento, Vermont, and Germany, but a new
report by the Los Angeles Business Council and UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation
"shows that neither LADWP’s proposed feed-in tariff nor Southern California Edison’s
existing feed-in tariff will effectively contribute" to LA's renewable energy goals. [
Full article]

April 5, 2010

NEW ELECTRICITY RATES COULD HURT RESIDENTIAL SOLAR MARKET (From
MercuryNews.com, written by Dana Hull
)

Bill Schrader uses a lot of electricity at his 5,200-square-feet house in Alamo, particularly
when the air conditioning runs during the sweltering summer months. But after installing
solar panels in January, his electric bill plunged from $450 per month on average to $45.
The drop was especially steep because the Schraders were among the 17 percent of
PG&E customers statewide who paid the highest prices for electricity in the utility's current
five-tiered rate system designed to reward conservation and punish big energy users with
high bills.
Those rates have been an enormous boon to California's burgeoning residential solar
industry, which often markets solar as a way for households that use a lot of power to save
money on electric bills. But now PG&E has proposed a new rate plan that many fear
could both discourage energy conservation and stall California's solar market. [
Full article]

March 22

MOJAVIE SOLAR PROJECT MOVES FORWARD (From the New York Times, written by
Todd Woody
)

California regulators on Wednesday recommended that the state’s first new big solar
power plant in nearly two decades be approved after a two-and-half-year review of its
environmental impact on the Mojave Desert.
The recommendation by staff members of the California Energy Commission — which still
must be accepted by the commission board — comes three weeks after the federal
Department of Energy offered the project’s builder, BrightSource Energy, a $1.37 billion
loan guarantee to construct the 392-megawatt Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System.
The Sierra Club, Defenders of Wildlife and the Center for Biological Diversity favor solar
energy projects, but objected to building the BrightSource power plant in the Ivanpah
Valley of Southern California, saying it would harm rare plants and animals like the desert
tortoise.  [
Full article]

March 21, 2010

COST OF SOLAR ENERGY FALLING (From Bakersfield Californian, written by Courtenay
Edelhart
)

David Stillwell is trying to wind down his monthly expenses so he'll have fewer bills when
he retires. Toward that end, last year he bought a solar energy system for his Rosedale
area home.
Since then, Stillwell's monthly electric bill has fallen from $450 during hot summer
months to an average of about $12 a month.
"I'm tickled pea green," said Stillwell, a 49-year-old correctional officer. "Now when I go
out to the mailbox and grab the PG&E bill out of there, I giggle. Before, I used to go weak
at the knees."  [
Full article]

March 10, 2010

ELECTRICITY RATE INCREASE COULD IMPACT SOLAR MARKET (From the New York
Times, written by Jennifer Steinhauer
)

Los Angeles averages more than 300 days of sunshine a year, and it often seems as if
environmentalists outnumber rattlesnakes in many parts of the sprawling city. It would
seem, then, that solar energy would be a thriving local industry here.
Now, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, the largest municipal utility in the
United States, is poised to pass a roughly 5 percent rate increase on electricity use. The
proceeds would be earmarked for renewable energy purchases and programs, including
one that would repay people or businesses that use solar panels to contribute to the
power grid.   [
Full article]

March 2, 2010

GOVERNOR SIGNS NET METERING LEGISLATION (From San Jose Mercury News,
written by Dana Hull
)

California's solar industry is celebrating a ray of good news: the cap on so-called "net
metering," which allows homes and businesses to earn credit for any excess solar power
they generate, has been doubled.
State law had required California's three largest utilities, including PG&E, to credit
customers for renewable power they send to the grid, but limited the program to 2.5
percent of a utility's peak demand. That meant that as soon as a utility got 2.5 percent of
its electricity from solar customers, they would no longer be required to sign new
contracts.
On Friday, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger signed legislation that doubles that cap to five
percent, a move widely supported by the solar industry and statewide environmental
groups.  [
Full article]

March 1, 2010

HOMEOWNER BATTLES CITY TO INSTALL SOLAR PANEL SUPPORT STRUCTURE
(
From Glendale News Press, written by Melanie Hicken)

Scott Peer’s quest to install solar energy panels has attracted the attention of a state
deputy attorney general who says that in blocking the project, the city is violating state law.
Peer has been sparring with city officials since 2008, when they nixed his plans to build a
metal structure to support solar panels because it did not meet required setback and
height restrictions.
The block came after Glendale Water & Power had already approved his solar project for
a state rebate of about $10,000 for the installation, Peer said.  [
Full article]

February 22, 2010

FEDERAL LOAN GRANTED FOR LARGE SCALE SOLAR PROJECT IN CALIFORNIA
DESERT (
From The New York Times, written by Todd Woody)

The United States Energy Department on Monday offered a $1.37 billion loan guarantee
to a company planning to build a large-scale solar power plant in the Southern California
desert.
The loan guarantee, for BrightSource Energy of Oakland, Calif., is the largest given for a
solar project. BrightSource’s 392-megawatt Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System is
the first utility-scale solar power plant to undergo licensing in California in nearly two
decades. It would use solar thermal technology, in which mirrors concentrate sunlight to
heat a fluid and generate steam, and if built it would be the world’s largest such plant.
[
Full article]

February 20, 2010

AS SOLAR PANELS INCREASE IN POPULARITY, SOLAR PANEL DISPOSAL WILL
BECOME AN ISSUE (
From earth911.com, written by Trey Granger)

The Utility Solar Assessment Study estimates that solar energy will account for 10 percent
of electricity use in the U.S. by 2025.
But like any other consumer product, solar panels have a limited shelf life and disposing
of old panels will eventually come into play.
So what do you do when you need to get rid of an obsolete panel? With a life expectancy
of more than 25 years, even the trailblazers of solar power panels should have several
years before they really need to worry, in theory. But some companies are wisely
anticipating the demand ahead of time.  [
Full article]

February 19, 2010

NET METERING BILL TO BE SIGNED BY GOVERNOR (From The San Diego Union
Tribune, written by Onell R. Soto
)

Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is poised to sign a bill to ensure that a key financial benefit
for installing solar power systems doesn’t go away too soon.
At issue is “net metering” — the idea that customers get credit for excess power they put
onto the grid.
With solar power systems increasingly popular additions to homes and businesses, some
parts of the state were at risk of hitting a cap this year preventing new customers from
being able to take advantage of the credits.  [
Full article]

February 14, 2010

CALIFORNIA CITY EYES LARGE SCALE SOLAR PROJECT (From The Los Angeles
Times, written by Todd Woody
)

A developer who proposes to cut down hundreds of trees to make way for a massive
project could expect to provoke a fair amount of environmental outrage.
Not in California City. Officials in this sprawling desert community east of Bakersfield are
thrilled at NextEra Energy's move to break out the chain saws.
The firm, a subsidiary of utility giant FPL Group, is seeking to build a solar power plant in
the area that would consume a large amount of water. The trees are tamarisks, a water-
hungry invasive species, and removing them could help recharge the aquifer in this arid
region.
"The water that normally would go into the tamarisk will go down into the basin -- it's a big
environmental win," said Michael Bevins, California City's public works director. [
Full
article]

February 3, 2010

LOS ANGELES DEPARTMENT OF WATER AND POWER EYEING OWENS VALLEY FOR
SOLAR PROJECT (
From The Los Angele Times, written by Phil Willon)

First it was silver ore that streamed to Los Angeles from the rim of the Owens Valley, then
the water from the valley floor.
Now, L.A. has come back for the sunshine.
The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, the agency responsible for turning
Owens Lake into a dusty salt flat and snatching up nearly every acre from Lone Pine to
Bishop, has its sights on transforming the Owens Valley into one of largest sources of
solar power in America. [
Full article]

January 27, 2010

WALMART COMPLETES SOLAR PROJECT
(From energymatters.com)

US retail giant Walmart announced completion of the company’s largest solar power
project at its distribution center in Apple Valley, California last week.
The solar farm consists of over 5,300 ground-mounted solar panels covering over 7 acres
with an output of one megawatt - enough to power 175 homes.
The Apple Valley Distribution Center installation is part of a solar power initiative Walmart
embarked on in May 2007 to purchase solar power systems for up to 22 of its stores and
distribution facilities in California and Hawaii. Last year the company announced it was
expanding its solar power initiative to nearly double its solar energy use in California.  
[
Full article]

January 25, 2010

CALIFORNIA GRANTS REBATES FOR SOLAR POWERED WATER HEATERS
(From The Los Angeles Times, written by Tiffany Hsu)

Utility regulators have approved $350 million in rebates to encourage Californians to
install water-heating systems powered by solar energy.
The state Public Utilities Commission on Thursday established the California Solar
Initiative Thermal Program, which will be funded using $250 million to replace natural-
gas-powered water heaters, with $25 million set aside for low-income customers. An
additional $100.8 million will be used to swap out water heaters powered by electricity.
The rebates could reduce the cost of a solar water heater by 15% to 25%, industry experts
said. The federal government also offers a 30% tax credit. [
Full article]

PG&E INVESTS IN SOLAR CITY (From triplepundit.com, written by Gina-Marie
Cheeseman
)

Last week, California utility company Pacific, Gas, & Electric (PG&E) subsidiary, Pacific
Venture Capital LLC, and the solar energy provider, SolarCity announced $60 million in
tax equity financing for solar installations. The investment is funded by PG&E Corporation
shareholders, and is expected to allow SolarCity to install more than 1,000 additional
solar systems for homes and businesses. The tax equity financing investment is the first of
its kind by a utility holding company, and the first collaboration between a utility holding
company and a solar power provider.  [
Full article]

January 14, 2010

COUNTY TO GRAPPLE WITH PLUSES, DRAWBACKS OF SOLAR GOLD
RUSH
(From Bakersfield.com, written by James Burger)

Kern County's reliable relationship with the sun has become an attractive lure for
companies who want to convert sunlight to electricity here.
This year county planners will be able to process 12 photovoltaic solar power plant
projects that, together, would cover thousands of acres of Kern County land.
On Tuesday Kern County supervisors will consider contracts -- totalling $2.4 million -- with
the two consulting companies that will prepare environmental reports for each of the 12
projects. [
Full article]

January 11, 2010

SOLAR PROJECT IN BENITO COUNTY SPARKS CONTROVERSY
(From Central
Coast News
)

HOLLISTER, Calif- Solar panels always come up when the concept of going green
comes up. However, not everyone is excited about a planned solar plant in San Benito
County.
Solargen wants to build a solar panel farm that would create enough energy to power
over 300,000 homes each year. The project is expected to cost almost 2 billion dollars
and depends largely on government grants.
Most people are surprised to learn that the outer reaches of eastern San Benito County
are home to over 90% of the suns solar output compared to the Mohave desert. That's
why Cupertino based Solargen, a company on the forefront of environmental solar energy
production, has proposed an epic project there.  [
Full article]

January 6, 2010

DO IT YOURSELF SOLAR POWER SOON TO BE AVAILABLE (From The Baltimore Sun,
written by Chris Kahn
)

Solar technology is going where it has never gone before: onto the shelves at retail stores
where do-it-yourselfers can now plunk a panel into a shopping cart and bring it home to
install.
Lowe's has begun stocking solar panels at its California stores and plans to roll them out
across the country next year.
This shows how far the highest of the high-tech alternative energy technologies has
come. Solar power is now accessible to anyone with a ladder, a power drill, and the
gumption to climb up on a roof and install the panels themselves.  [
Full article]

January 5, 2010

SOLAR PROJECT PROPOSED NEAR RENO (From The Reno Gazette-Journal, written by
Susan Voyoles
)

Vidler Water Co. is proposing to build a 100-megawatt solar farm, one of the largest in the
country, at its Fish Springs Ranch about 40 miles from Reno in northern Washoe County.
If approved by Washoe County and regional officials, construction is planned to start in
2011 and be phased in over 10 to 15 years.
Several larger solar projects, including two near San Luis Obispo, Calif., also are being
planned, said Richard Ferguson, coordinator for California's renewable energy
transmission initiative. [
Full article]

December 21, 2009

LEGISLATION HALTS SOLAR PROJECT (From The New York Times, written by Todd
Woody
)

Senator Dianne Feinstein introduced legislation in Congress on Monday to protect a
million acres of the Mojave Desert in California by scuttling some 13 big solar plants and
wind farms planned for the region.
But before the bill to create two new Mojave national monuments has even had its first
hearing, the California Democrat has largely achieved her aim. Regardless of the
legislation’s fate, her opposition means that few if any power plants are likely to be built in
the monument area, a complication in California’s effort to achieve its aggressive goals
for renewable energy. [
Full article]

December 16,2009

OAKLAND'S PROPERTY TAX BILLS TO FUND SOLAR WORK
(
From SFGate / the San Francisco Chronicles, written by Carolyn Jones)

Oakland has become the latest city to allow residents to finance solar panels, insulation,
new refrigerators and other efficiency improvements through their property tax bills.
"This is a dream way to do solar," City Council President Jane Brunner said. "The problem
with solar has always been the up-front costs. This eliminates that problem."
The council unanimously voted to join California First, a state plan based on the solar
financing package first adopted by Berkeley in 2007.
The plan allows residential and commercial property owners to make energy
improvements without paying up-front costs. [
Full article]

December 2, 2009

OWENS LAKE AS SOLAR POWER PLANT? (From the Los Angeles Times, written by Phil
Wilton
)

Nearly a century after Los Angeles drained Owens Lake by diverting its water to the Los
Angeles Aqueduct, the city now hopes to generate solar energy on the dusty salt flats it left
behind.
The Department of Water and Power's board of commissioners Tuesday unanimously
approved a renewable energy pilot project that would cover 616 acres of lake bed with
solar arrays -- a possible precursor to a mammoth solar farm that could cover thousands
of acres.[
Full article]

November 30, 2009

SOLAR PANELS CAUSING SOME STORMS (From the Los Angeles Times, written by
Catherine Saillant
)

Even as California and the federal government encourage solar power, homeowners
often have to fight homeowners associations for their right to install the systems.
Ready to chuck his electric bills, Camarillo resident Marc Weinberg last year asked his
homeowners association for permission to put solar panels on his roof.[
Full article]

November 23, 2009

SOLAR ENERGY INDUSTRY STIMULATES ECONOMY (From the Los Angeles Times,
written by Todd Woody
)

Areas hard-hit by the U.S. automakers' slump are pitching themselves to green
technology firms. Workers and machines that used to crank out cars are now making
parts for solar and wind power plants.
At a recent solar energy conference in Anaheim, economic development officials from
Ohio talked up a state that seemed far removed from the solar panels and high-tech
devices that dominated the convention floor.
November 19, 2009 [
Full article]

SAN DIEGO COMMUNITY COLLEGES GO SOLAR (
From Campus Technology, written by
Dian Schaffhauser
)

The San Diego Community College District (SDCCD) is going solar without having to
make a capital investment. The district recently approved a 20-year agreement with
Borrego Solar, a national solar power contractor based in San Diego suburb El Cajon,
CA, to construct and maintain a photovoltaic system that will annually provide about 2.4
megawatts of green energy at six locations in the district, the equivalent of powering 650
homes per year. A comparably sized installation was built by Borrego Solar at the
University of California, San Diego and finished in 2009.  [
Full article]

November 17, 2009

SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY OPPOSES MOJAVE PROJECT (From the Los Angeles
Times, written by Louis Sahagun
)

A solar energy project proposed for development on public land in the Mojave Desert
would create jobs mostly for Las Vegas and electricity for San Francisco at the expense of
the relatively pristine area of east San Bernardino County where it would be built, San
Bernardino County Supervisor Brad Mitzelfelt said.
In an interview, Mitzelfelt, whose district includes the Ivanpah Valley project site, about 20
miles south of Las Vegas, said last week that BrightSource's proposed 440-megawatt,
4,000-acre Solar Electric Generating System "should not go forward."  [
Full article]

November 12, 2009

LARGEST SOLAR POWERED HOME COMMUNITY FROM A SINGLE BUILDER OPENS
IN SANTA FE SPRINGS (
From the Los Angeles Times)

Not far from downtown Los Angeles, Comstock Homes is opening what it claims to be the
largest solar-powered home community from a single builder.
The Villages at Heritage Springs will take up 54 acres in Santa Fe Springs, and will
include 384 residences once it is complete. For now, 18 single-family homes and 19
townhouses are for sale.
Comstock Homes, the residential division of commercial real estate developer Comstock,
Crosser & Associates, builds only in California. [
Full article]

November 10, 2009

ENVIRONMENTALISTS FIGHT OVER FUTURE OF RENEWABLE ENERGY IN
CALIFORNIA (
From California Lawyer Magazine, written by Ed Humes)

The state's new solar gold rush is generating far more conflict than current. At issue is not
whether we should green the grid, but how to do so: Should we build massive solar-
powered generating plants deep in the Mojave Desert on ecologically sensitive public
lands to take advantage of some of the most sun-drenched landscapes on earth? Or
would it be just as effective, with less impact on the environment, to deploy thousands of
smaller solar arrays closer to civilization—on abandoned farms, urban "brownfields," and
rooftops?  [
Full article]

COMPANY SEEKS TO MAKE SOLAR ENERGY MORE AFFORDABLE (
From USA Today,
written by Julie Schmit
)

California-based SolarCity has emerged as one of the top consumer brands in solar at a
time when green is hot and President Obama makes solar and other renewable energy
sources front-page news.
Last year, SolarCity helped pioneer a way to bring solar to the masses and remove one of
the biggest hurdles to its widespread adoption: costs of $15,000 or more for homeowners
to go solar. With a SolarCity residential lease, customers can lease a system at no money
down, and in many areas, save 10% to 15% a month on their combined electric and
lease-payment bill, SolarCity says.  [
Full article]  

November 2, 2009

SOLAR INCENTIVES DEBATED (From North Bay Business Journal, written by Loralee
Stevens
)

A long-awaited move by the state to compensate homeowners for excess alternative
energy got mixed reviews from the North Bay solar industry.
Written by Assemblyman Jared Huffman, D-San Rafael, AB 920 requires utilities to pay for
or credit energy generated by wind or solar and fed into the grid after the system owner
has offset his own utility bill.  [
Full article]

October 27, 2009

UTILITY COMPANY TO BUY MORE POWER FROM RESIDENTS AND BUSINESSES
(
From pressdemocrat.com)

California's largest utility said Monday it plans to boost the amount of solar power it buys
from residents and businesses as the state pushes for wider use of alternative energy.
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger predicted the proposal by San Francisco-based Pacific Gas
& Electric Co. would open the way for more companies and homeowners to install rooftop
panels to generate power.
Schwarzenegger last month ordered utilities to get a third of their power from renewable
sources by 2020, the most aggressive green energy standard in the nation. [
Full article]

October 22, 2009

FARM SUPPLY COMPANY GOES SOLAR (From Central Valley Business Times)

Verdegaal Brothers Inc. says the Sun is replacing the electric company when it comes to
providing power for its fertilizer and soil amendment company in Hanford.
The plant recently switched on its 188-kilowatt solar power system that includes ground
mounted thin-film photovoltaic panels on a one-acre site.
The company estimates the solar power system will also mean over $350,000 in tax
incentives, cash rebates and accelerated market depreciation while saving about
$60,000 in annual energy costs.  [
Full article]

October 18, 2009

CALIFORNIA SOLAR PROJECT DELAYED BY ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS (From Los
Angeles Times, written by Louis Sahagun
)

Across the desert flatlands of southeastern California, dozens of companies have flooded
federal offices with applications to place solar mirrors on more than a million acres of
public land.
But just as some of those projects appear headed toward fruition, environmental hurdles
threaten to jeopardize efforts to further tap the region's renewable energy potential.  [
Full
article]

October 12, 2009

CALIFORNIA CREATES INCENTIVES FOR SOLAR POWER (From Reuters, written by
Laura Isensee
)

California is heating up its push for clean energy, as Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger
approved a new subsidy for solar power on Monday and joined forces with the federal
government to fast-track renewable energy projects.
California has the most aggressive renewable energy goals in the United States, which
Schwarzenegger increased last month when he ordered that the state get a third of its
electricity from renewable resources by 2020.  [
Full article]

October 6, 2009

PASADENA INSTALLS SOLAR POWERED TRASH CANS (From Pasadena Star News)

The city will soon be installing 40 solar-powered trash compactors on city streets.The
compactors use power smash down garbage making city staff able to come empty them
less frequently.  Staff estimates that garbage men will now only have to empty those trash
cans once a week instead of five times a week.  That will save the city an estimated
$61,400 in fuel and maintenance costs, and should reduce the city's greenhouse gas
emissions since garbage trucks will go out less frequently.  The city has already installed
the solar trash cans in six spots as part of a pilot project.

CALIFORNIA EYES EUROPEAN SOLAR MARKET (
From Wall Street Journal, written by
Cassandra Sweet
)

California's solar-power market, the world's third largest, could be on the verge of an
expansion if proposals to adopt European-style above-market tariffs prove successful.
California's abundant sunshine, relatively high utility rates and solar subsidies have made
rooftop solar generation a popular choice. Meanwhile, the state's utilities have been
signing contracts with large-scale solar farms, among other types of renewable-energy
generators, to meet stringent state requirements. What's been missing is a German-style
market for small and medium-size solar generators to sell their output to utilities at above-
market rates. California officials are now attempting to import some of the magic that
turned Germany into the world's top solar market, in the form of feed-in tariffs. [
Full article]

September 29, 2009

SOLAR CON JOB (
From City Watch, written by Jack Humphreville)

Why are Mayor Villaraigosa, David Freeman, and the Department of Water and Power
deliberately misleading the DWP Rate Payers and City Council about the cost of the 400
megawatts of in basin solar power (the “Measure B Assets”)?  [
Full article]

September 28, 2009

SOLAR PLAN HAS ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES (
From NPR, written
by Jeff Brady
)

An Obama administration plan to build huge new solar energy plants in the Southwest is
causing heartburn in the environmental community.
The Interior Department has proposed allowing two dozen solar energy study areas on
public land in California, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and Colorado. These would
be industrial facilities that would require huge amounts of land and water to operate. They
wouldn't allow room for other uses on the land such as recreation.  [
Full article]

September 18, 2009

LARGE SCALE SOLAR PROJECT DROPPED (
from The New York Times,
written by Elisabeth Rosenthal
)

A proposed solar energy project in the California desert that caused intense friction
between environmentalists and the developers of renewable energy has been shelved.
BrightSource Energy Inc. had planned a 5,130-acre solar power farm in a remote part of
the Mojave Desert, on land previously intended for conservation. The company, based in
Oakland, Calif., said Thursday that it was instead seeking an alternative site for the
project.  [
Full article]

September 15, 2009

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE'S INACTION JEOPARDIZES FUTURE OF NET
METERING (
from Sacramento Bee, written by Jim Downing)

Orders for solar power systems have been surging in Northern California, but a legislative
technicality is threatening to trip up the sector's growth.
The 2006 bill that created California's "million solar roofs" program provided generous
ratepayer-funded subsidies for solar electricity. But, in part to allay electric-utility anxieties
about runaway growth of self-generated power, it also set a limit on how much solar
capacity could be set up for "net metering."  [
Full article]

SCHWARZENEGGER PLANS TO EXECUTIVE ORDER TO REACH CALIFORNIA
RENEWABLE ENERGY GOAL (
from Sacramento Bee, written by Susan Ferriss)

Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger will take charge today of how California utilities meet a goal
that one-third of their power be generated by renewable energy by 2020.
Schwarzenegger plans to issue an executive order, aides said, that will instruct the
California Air Resources Control Board to design regulations for how utilities can meet a
33 percent renewable goal.  [
Full article]

FIREFIGHTERS MUST TAKE INTO CONSIDERATION SOLAR PANELS WHEN FIGHTING
HOUSE FIRES (
from publicceo.com, written by Lance Howland)

As solar panels pop up on more California roofs, firefighters are getting serious about
finding education and training to fight fires that involve new energy technologies.
One new tool is a video produced and narrated by a captain for the San Jose Fire
Department. “Being a firefighter, I understand what firefighters want to know,” said Matt
Paiss.  The video gives working firefighters practical advice for minimizing the risk of
electrocution as they clamber on a fiery roof that holds photovoltaic (PV) panels.  [
Full
article]

September 12, 2009

WORLD'S LARGEST SOLAR PLANT SCHEDULED TO BE BUILT IN CHINA (From
gizmag, written by Sandra Arcaro
)

In the midst of overwhelming debate over climate change - an issue that seemingly
paralyzes politicians - the Chinese government has announced its intention to construct a
2-gigawatt solar power plant in Ordos City, Inner Mongolia. Mike Ahearn, CEO of the
Arizona-based company which will construct the plant, describes the unprecedented
project as “an encouraging first step forward toward the mass-scale deployment of solar
power worldwide to help mitigate climate change concerns.”  [
Full article]

September 8, 2009

HOME SOLAR PRICES FALLING AS REBATES SHRINK (from Mercurynews.com, written
by Brandon Bailey)

Even as a state rebate is shrinking, the price of residential solar power is dropping, thanks
to lower installation costs and a glut in the supply of key components.
That's putting it in reach of more people and prompting solar advocates to say the day is
coming when rebates and tax credits won't be needed to spur the growth of the
renewable energy industry. [
Full article ]

September 7, 2009

SAN LUIS ECONOMY ENERGIZED BY SOLAR PROJECT (from San Luis Obispo Tribune,
written by David Sneed
)

If three commercial solar plants are built as planned in the California Valley, San Luis
Obispo County will become a national leader in renewable energy.
The plants will stimulate the economy, especially during construction, and diversify its
business base. Local schools of all levels are expected to expand their renewable energy
curricula and use the solar plants as learning tools.  [
Full article]

September 4, 2009

CALIFORNIA SOLAR COMPANY RECEIVES $535 LOAN GUARANTEE (from Central
Valley Business Times
)

Solyndra Inc., a Fremont company that designs and manufactures photovoltaic systems,
is getting the backing of Uncle Sam to expand its operations, adding as many as 3,000
jobs.
Solyndra says it will use the money to build and operate a commercial-scale facility to
manufacture the next generation of rooftop solar systems. The operation is expected to
generate at least 3,000 clean energy jobs in an area whose largest employer – the auto
manufacturing plant NUMMI – is expected to shut down by next spring. [
Full article ]

September 3, 2009

USE OF MOJAVE FOR SOLAR PROJECT SPURNS DEBATE (from Deverpost.com,
written by Michael Riley
)

If the vast creosote-covered plain that is California's Mojave Desert represents to some
the grand potential of America's renewable-energy future, Jim Harvey sees something
else.
"Their model is 'You must kill land to save land,' " said Harvey, a Web- page designer and
homegrown activist who sees the Obama administration's push for green energy here as
a destructive force poised to swallow his beloved desert. "How does that make any
sense?" [
Full article ]

August 27, 2009

COST OF SOLAR PANELS FALL (from UPI.com)

Market analysts at investment bank Piper Jaffray said the cost of solar panels has
plunged in the past year due to increased supply and decreased demand.
The price of a critical ingredient for many solar panels, polysilicon, has dropped as more
producers have entered the market.  [
Full article ]

HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATIONS HINDER SOLAR PANEL INSTALLATION (
from Cooler
Planet, written by Jeanne Roberts
)

News coming out of Woodbury, Minnesota, via the New York Times, shows just how
difficult it can be, from a regulatory standpoint, to add solar photovoltaic panels to the roof
of a residence.
In Woodbury, the obstacle to John Wood’s solar future was the Wedgewood
Homeowners Association, whose president, Brad Winterle, seems to believe that the
appearance of a neighborhood is a more critical issue than America’s need to adopt
clean, alternative energies like solar.  [
Full article ]

August 25, 2009

UTILITY COMPANIES FEAR ROOFTOP SOLAR PANELS (from Newsweek, written by
Matthew Philips)

Not long ago, most homeowners saw their roofs as simply something to keep the rain
out. Now they see them as a source of electricity. Despite the bad economy, or maybe
because of it, the rooftop-solar industry is booming, as Americans become increasingly
intrigued by the idea of turning their roofs into mini power plants and cutting their electric
bills. In 2008, 33,500 rooftop solar systems were installed in the United States, a 63
percent increase over the amount of capacity installed in 2007. In California, the solar
capital of country, the increase was 95 percent. [
Full article ]

August 7, 2009

CONDO COMMUNITIES RESTRICT SOLAR PANEL INSTALLATION (from The Desert
Sun, written by K. Kaufmann
)  

Stuart and Anne Carlson have a perfect roof for solar panels on their home at The Lakes
Country Club in Palm Desert — it's got a full southern exposure and a tilted surface.
Advertisement.  But The Lakes is a condominium community, and that means the
Carlsons don't own the roof of their 4,400-square-foot home.  It's considered a common
area, and The Lakes' homeowners association doesn't allow solar installations on
publicly visible roofs, which, with its golf course location, the Carlsons' definitely is.  [
Full
article ]

August 1, 2009

WEAK ECONOMY MAKING SOLAR PANELS MORE AFFORDABLE (from Los Angeles
Times, written by Maria Dickerson
)

If you're searching for a bright spot in a dismal economic climate, look no farther than
your roof. The downturn is helping to make solar panels more affordable.
Manufacturers are cutting prices to move inventory. Uncle Sam is helping too. As part of
the economic stimulus package, the federal government this year boosted tax credits to
homeowners who switch to solar power. Together with state incentives, those subsidies
could slash the cost of some systems in California by 50% or more. Some homeowners
are banding together into buying groups for even bigger savings.  [
Full article ]

July 30, 2009

GREEN PEACE RELEASES SOLAR POWER GLOBAL OUTLOOK, 2009 (from
Greenpeace.org
)

With advanced industry development and high levels of energy efficiently, concentrated
solar power could meet up to 7% of the world's power needs by 2030 and fully one
quarter by 2050.  [
Full report ]

July 22, 2009

COUPLE LEADS BY EXAMPLE, INSTALLS SOLAR SYSTEM ON PROPERTY (from
htrnews.com, written by Sarah Kloepping
)

The Kapitzes installed a rack of 36 solar panels on their property to help power their
Manitowoc home. Each panel is about 40-by-60 inches and generates 198 watts of
electricity, or 7,200 watts total.  "I anticipate saving quite a bit," Arnie Kapitz said. "I
estimate it's going to be nearly three-quarters of what I'm using now. I just plugged it in
(Thursday), so I'll be a lot smarter six months or a year from now when I get the data."  
[
Full article ]

July 21, 2009

UTILITY COMPANY COMBATS HEATWAVE WITH NEW TECHNOLOGY (from sgvtribune.
com, written by Matt Draper
):

On Tuesday, Southern California Gas Company company unveiled two new solar power
collectors at its Energy Resource Center in Downey to power the building's air
conditioning and showcase new cost-effective and environmentally clean technologies.
The Gas Company's research and development program works to find "solutions for our
customers to lower their cost and reduce their carbon footprint," said Gas Company
spokeswoman Denise King.  [
Full article ]

HOMEOWNERS CAN TURN TO UTILITIES FOR HELP WITH SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEM
(f
rom Greentechsolar):

When consumers realize their solar energy systems aren't working as expected, they
don't always call their installers for help.
In fact, Pacific Gas and Electric, the California utility with the most residential and small
commercial installations in the state, has found itself getting calls from people about
faulty systems even though the utility isn't responsible for monitoring them.  [
Full article ]

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON LAUNCHES ADVANCED SOLAR SYSTEMS (f
rom
virtualization.sys-con.com
):

To help accelerate the commercialization of new technology that uses the sun's energy,
rather than the electric grid or natural gas, to power air-conditioning systems, Southern
California Gas Co. (The Gas Company) has launched a multi-year showcase of advanced
concentrated solar power systems to benefit businesses and the region.  [
Full article ]

July 15, 2009

USE OF SOLAR ENERGY IN CALIFORNIA ON THE RISE (from Los Angeles Times,
written by Margot Roosevelt
)

It is far from the "Million Solar Roofs" that Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger touted, but the
number of rooftop solar installations in California has grown from an estimated 500 a
decade ago to nearly 50,000 today. And in the last three years, the Golden State's solar
market has more than doubled.  [
Full article ]

July 14, 2009

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT ACCELERATES PROGRAM TO CONSTRUCT LARGE SCALE
SOLAR PLANTS (
from Green Inc., written by Todd Woody):

The Department of the Interior’s move last month to accelerate development of large-
scale solar power plants on federal land in six Western states could give an edge to
companies that have already staked lease claims in 24 new “solar energy study areas.”
The initiative covers 670,000 acres overseen by the department’s Bureau of Land
Management in Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada and Utah. [
Full
article ]

July 12, 2009

SOLAR PANEL FEES LOWERED IN SAN GABRIEL VALLEY (from sgvtribune.com, written
by Daniel Tedord
):

It will cost consumers less green to go green in some San Gabriel Valley communities.
Over the past week many cities cut their fees for solar panel installation following a Sierra
Club report that detailed the high costs of permits.
The report showed a number of San Gabriel Valley cities charged more than $1,000 for
solar panel installation permits. Many others locally charged well above the southern
California average of $493.  [
Full article ]

USE OF SOLAR ENERGY BECOMING POPULAR IN CENTRAL CALIFORNIA CITIES
(
from Central Coast, written by Kurtis Alexander):

Solar panels have long been the domain of eco-conscious communities like Santa Cruz
and Berkeley. Not anymore.
A new report on solar energy suggests California's more traditional, inland regions have
jumped on the bandwagon and in some cases out-greened their coastal counterparts.
"The face of solar power is changing," said Bernadette Del Chiaro, clean energy advocate
with Environment California, the nonprofit research group that authored the report. "We're
seeing more than the usual adoptees like the Santa Cruz and the coastal areas. We're
seeing Bakersfield and Fresno, typically conservative cities, embracing solar power."  [
Full
article ]

July 10, 2009

DEVELOPMENT COMPANY GETS CALIFORNIA CONTRACT (from Phoenix Business
Journal
)

Tessera Solar will develop projects on land owned by Riverside County, Calif., including
landfills and undeveloped property.
Tessera, the Houston-based sister company of Stirling Energy Systems in Scottsdale, will
work with Optiflex Properties & Development LLC to develop and finance the solar
projects, which could generate as much as 500 megawatts of power. The two companies
were chosen through a county request for proposals.  [
Full article ]

July 6, 2009

NEW LEGISLATION SEEKS TO EXPAND CALIFORNIA'S NET METERING PROGRAM
(
from Los Angeles Times, written by Marc Lifsher):

A bill seeks to quadruple the amount of electricity consumers with roof panels may sell.
The solar industry pushes to pass it. PG & E, Southern California Edison and San Diego
Gas & Electric oppose.  [
Full article ]

July 5, 2009

PERMITS FOR SOLAR PANEL INSTALLATION COSTLY IN SAN GABRIEL VALLEY (from
Pasadena Star-News, written by Daniel Tedford
):

San Gabriel Valley cities charge residents more than most other Southland communities
when it comes to solar panel installations, according to a new report by the Sierra Club.
Eight local cities charge more than $1,000 in permit fees for a $27,000 project to install
standard 3-kilowatt solar panels, according to the survey.  [
Full article ]

July 4, 2009

CANADA RESIDENTS NOT GRANTED PROTECTIONS OF SOLAR SHADE CONTROL
ACT STRUGGLE TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF SOLAR ENERGY (
from thestar.com, written
by Catherine Porter
);

As solar power becomes more common in Toronto, creating a shadow is more than just
unneighbourly.  Under current Canadian law, property owners have the right to build and
plant trees that infringe on neighboring owners use of solar energy.  [
Full article ]

July 2, 2009

UPDATE ON BLM'S "FAST TRACK" FOR DESERT SOLAR PROJECTS (from the
Riverside Press Enterprise):

July 2, 2009 - The U.S. secretary of the interior on Monday declared 676,000 acres of the
Southwest -- half in Riverside and San Bernardino counties -- as prime areas for large-
scale solar energy development.
The action means that applications to build projects in the 24 solar study areas, including
vast sections of desert in the two counties, will be fast-tracked to meet federal energy
goals, Secretary Ken Salazar announced at a news conference in Las Vegas.
President Barack Obama has ordered that 10 percent of the nation's power come from
renewable sources by next year and 25 percent by 2025. [
Full article ]

June 30, 2009

SANTA MONICA PASSES LAW STREAMLINING SOLAR INSTALLATIONS (from The
LookOut News, written by Jorge Casuso
):

Despite worries that aesthetics could trump efficiency, the City Council Tuesday passed a
law that makes it easier to install solar panels on commercial and multi-family buildings
in Santa Monica.The ordinance allows solar energy systems that “meet objective
development standards” to be approved without a public hearing and also allows them to
encroach into setback areas and extend above current height limits. [
Full article ]

June 29, 2009

BLM ANNOUNCES "FAST TRACK" FOR DESERT SOLAR PROJECTS (press release
from the Bureau of Land Management):

June 29, 2009 - LAS VEGAS, Nevada – Under initiatives announced today by Secretary of
the Interior Ken Salazar and U.S. Senator Harry Reid (D-NV), federal agencies will work
with western leaders to designate tracts of U.S. public lands in the West as prime zones
for utility-scale solar energy development, fund environmental studies, open new solar
energy permitting offices and speed reviews of industry proposals. [
Full article ]

June 28, 2009

SOLAR PERMIT FEES IN SOME SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CITIES TOO COSTLY (from
the Press-Telegram, written by Joe Segura
):

A large number of Southland cities are charging high fees for solar panel permits,
ignoring a state mandate designed to promote the energy system, according to a survey
by the Sierra Club.The Angeles Chapter of the Sierra Club said it has launched a
campaign to reverse the trend, asking several dozen agencies with reported permit fees
of $750 or more to review their solar-permit fee methodologies that are higher than cost-
recovery levels.  [
Full article ]

June 25, 2009

FEES IMPOSED BY SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CITIES HINDERING ALTERNATIVE
ENERGY SOURCES (
from the dailybreeze.com)

At a time when the federal government is trying to reduce our dependence on foreign oil
and increase the use of renewable energy, cities in Southern California are hindering the
installation of solar panels on homes through wild variations in permit fees and long
waits.  [
Full article ]

June 18, 2009

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON PLAN APPROVED TO CREATE NATIONS LARGEST
SOLAR INSTALLATION PROGRAM (from Edison International)

A plan proposed by Southern California Edison (SCE) for the largest U.S. installation of
advanced solar panels on otherwise unused large commercial rooftops across Southern
California was approved today by the California Public Utilities Commission.
During the next five years SCE will install, own and operate 250 megawatts of solar
generating capacity. The utility also will conduct competitive solicitations offering long-
term power contracts to independent solar power providers who will install an additional
250 megawatts, bringing to 500 megawatts the total generating capacity of the project —
the largest photovoltaic program ever undertaken.  [
Full article ]
Solar  Rights
What is the Solar Shade Control Act?

The Solar Shade Control Act restricts
the planting and growing of trees which
cast shade on solar panels. As amended
in 2008, the Act prevents any property
owner from the planting or maintaining of
any tree or brush that will cast a shadow
on greater than 10% of the solar
collector’s absorption surface at any time
between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and
2:00 p.m. The Act in effect grants an
implied solar easement restricting
neighboring land owners from blocking a
collector’s access to sunlight.

The statutes comprising California's
Solar Shade Control Act can be accessed
by
clicking here.
Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin
Publications

AGC is pleased to announce that attorney
Matthew M. Gorman is featured in a
recent North Bay Business Journal Article
concerning California's Solar Rights Act:  
"
As solar panels proliferate, so do legal
questions."

Read Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin's article
published in the
Apartment Owners
Association News magazine by clicking
here

Read Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin's article
published on the Apartment Association's
Website by
clicking here.

Read Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin's article
on PublicCEO.com by
clicking here

Read Alvarez-Glasman & Colvin's article
in the North Bay Business Journal's  
Executive Legal Guide by
clicking here
What is Net Metering?

Net metering allows owners of an eligible
power generator to offset their energy
costs by exporting unused electricity
generated to the power grid.  Customers
are credited with the energy contributed
to the grid and are only billed for their
consumption of electricity exceeding
those contributions.  

The statutes comprising California's Net
Metering Law can be accessed by
clicking here.

AB 510, recently signed into law,
increases the net metering cap from
2.5% to 5% of the of the electric utility's
peak consumer demand.  
Read AB 510
here.  
"Feed in Tariff"  Legislation

California Assembly Bill 432 provides for a
pilot program in Palm Desert for “solar
feed-in tariffs” and standard contracts
associated with the tariffs for small
electrical generators.

Basically, the Bill requires Southern
California Edison to pay for every
kilowatthour of electricity generated and
delivered to its grid by solar energy
systems meeting the requirements of the
Bill within the City of Palm Desert.

Read the full text of the Bill by
clicking
here.
County of Los Angeles Debuts New
Solar Mapping Program

Los Angeles County officials have
unveiled a solar mapping program that
will allow homeowners and businesses
to go online to determine if their
properties are good candidates for solar
power.

Read full Press Release by
clicking here.